Monday, 22 July 2013

NASA releases images of Earth by two interplanetary spacecraft

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Color and black-and-white images of Earth taken by two NASA interplanetary spacecraft on July 19 show our planet and its moon as bright beacons from millions of miles away in space. NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured the color images of Earth and the moon from its perch in the Saturn system nearly 900 million miles (1.5 billion kilometers) away. MESSENGER, the first probe to orbit Mercury, took a black-and-white image from a distance of 61 million miles (98 million kilometers) as part of a campaign to search for natural satellites of the planet.

via Science Daily

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NASA Releases Images of Earth Taken By Distant Spacecraft

Color and black-and-white images of Earth taken by two NASA interplanetary spacecraft July 19 show our planet and its moon as bright beacons from millions of miles away in space.

via NASA Breaking News

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2013/july/nasa-releases-images-of-earth-taken-by-distant-spacecraft

Two in one solution for low cost polymer LEDs and solar cells

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Scientists have just made a considerable improvement in device performance of polymer-based optoelectronic devices. The new plasmonic material, can be applied to both polymer light-emitting diodes and polymer solar cells, with world-record high performance, through a simple and cheap process.

via Science Daily

Space Station Cargo Ship Activities to Air on NASA TV

NASA Television will provide live coverage of the departure of one Russian cargo spacecraft from the International Space Station (ISS) on Thursday, July 25 and the launch and docking of another to the station Saturday, July 27.

via NASA Breaking News

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2013/july/space-station-cargo-ship-activities-to-air-on-nasa-tv

First graphene commercialization summit highlights main directions

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The first Graphene Commercialisation and Applications Summit was held June 25 and 26 in London. The summit gathered key players of the graphene industry, together with those that wish to use graphene but are not yet using it, as well as investors. The variety of speakers and guests provided for a dynamic mixture, as witnessed first-hand by our CEO Jesus de la Fuente.


"The meeting helped us to establish new connections, and see what old ones are up to," says Jesus. "Graphenea definitely enjoys networking with other members of the graphene industry and this meeting provided a good environment for that."


Jani Kivioja of Nokia mentions Graphenea in his talk.Speakers included lead researchers of industry giants, such as HEAD, BASF, Airbus and Volvo. HEAD proudly showed the first commercial graphene product - their now famous graphene tennis racquet. Nokia was also there, providing insight into the company's research into graphene-enabled mobile devices, as well as outlining their lead role in the European Commision's Graphene Flagship. Graphenea partners with Nokia on several projects to bring high-quality graphene to the real world market. Nokia, as well as Jari Kinaret (head of the Graphene Flagship) and the representative of Thales cited Graphenea as as their graphene producer partner. Graphenea partners with many large industrial leaders and academic research labs.


The conference was held in a friendly and collaborative atmosphere, with ample time for discussion and establishing new partnerships. These kinds of meetings are very welcome, as they support the coherent development of the graphene industry and help push the technology forward. We look forward to next year's meeting, at the same place around the same time!






via Graphenea

NASA's Hubble sees a stranger in the crowd

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The constellation of Virgo (The Virgin) is the largest of the Zodiac constellations, and the second largest overall after Hydra (The Water Snake). Its most appealing feature, however, is the sheer number of galaxies that lie within it. In this picture, among a crowd of face- and edge-on spiral, elliptical, and irregular galaxies, lies NGC 4866, a lenticular galaxy situated about 80 million light-years from Earth.



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"Valleytronics" – a new type of electronics in diamond

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(Phys.org) —An alternative and novel concept in electronics is to utilize the wave quantum number of the electron in a crystalline material to encode information. In a new article in Nature Materials, Isberg et.al. propose using this valley degree of freedom in diamond to enable valleytronic information processing or as a new route to quantum computing.



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European Physical Society honours ATLAS, CMS and LHCb


Today in Stockholm, Sweden, the European Physical Society High Energy Physics Division announced the winners of its 2013 prizes. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations, and a young experimental physicist from LHCb were among the winners.


The 2013 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to high-energy physics, was awarded to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, “for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism”, and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni, and Tejinder Virdee, “for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments”.


The 2013 Young Experimental Physicist Prize, for outstanding work by one or more young physicists in the field of particle physics and or particle astrophysics, was awarded to Diego Martinez Santos “for his outstanding contributions to the trigger and commissioning of the LHCb experiment, and the analyses leading to first evidence for the rare decay B0s→ยต+ยต− [B to two muons]”.


The 2013 Outreach Prize, for outstanding outreach achievement connected with high-energy physics and or particle astrophysics, was awarded to Don Lincoln of Fermilab, “for communicating in multiple media the excitement of high-energy physics to high-school students and teachers, and the public at large”.





via CERN updates

http://home.web.cern.ch/about/updates/2013/07/european-physical-society-honours-atlas-cms-and-lhcb

Electronics: Graphene makes a magnetic switch

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Tiny nanoribbons of carbon could be used to make a magnetic field sensor for novel electronic devices.

via Science Daily