Tuesday, 1 October 2013

'Accelerator on a chip' demonstrated

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In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.



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Scientists directly observe bound states of elementary magnets in ferromagnetic quantum crystals

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Simulating solid state properties with precisely controlled quantum systems is an important goal of the Quantum Many-Body Systems Division at MPQ. Now the team around Professor Immanuel Bloch (Chair for Experimental Physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit├Ąt Munich and Director at MPQ) has come again a step closer to it – to be precise, to the understanding of processes in ferromagnetic solid state crystals in which elementary excitations, so-called magnons, can emerge. About 80 years ago the German physicist Hans Bethe deduced from a theoretical model that in one-dimensional ferromagnets two of those elementary magnetic excitations can form a bound state. Like two tiny bar magnets, two atoms can stick together and form a new particle that propagates in the crystal. The MPQ team has now succeeded to observe these most elementary mobile magnetic domains, the two-magnon states, directly and to resolve their dynamics with time-resolved measurements. This study complements conventional spectroscopy in solid state crystals which yields information on momentum and frequency of the magnetic excitations. Bound states of excitations can influence the thermal conductance properties of low-dimensional ferromagnets or the propagation speed of quantum information in magnetic wires.



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Observations reveal critical interplay of interstellar dust, hydrogen

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(Phys.org) —For astrophysicists, the interplay of hydrogen—the most common molecule in the universe—and the vast clouds of dust that fill the voids of interstellar space has been an intractable puzzle of stellar evolution.



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A first: Stanford engineers build computer using carbon nanotube technology

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A team of Stanford engineers has built a basic computer using carbon nanotubes, a semiconductor material that has the potential to launch a new generation of electronic devices that run faster, while using less energy, than those made from silicon chips.



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'Jekyll and Hyde' star morphs from radio to X-ray pulsar and back again

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Astronomers have uncovered the strange case of a neutron star with the peculiar ability to transform from a radio pulsar into an X-ray pulsar and back again. This star's capricious behavior appears to be fueled by a nearby companion star and may give new insights into the birth of millisecond pulsars.



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Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter

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Harvard and MIT scientists are challenging the conventional wisdom about light, and they didn't need to go to a galaxy far, far away to do it.



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Herschel throws new light on oldest cosmic light

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(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have achieved a first detection of a long-sought component in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This component, known as B-mode polarisation, is caused by gravitational lensing, the bending of light by massive structures as it travels across the Universe. The result is based on the combination of data from the South Pole Telescope and ESA's Herschel Space Observatory. This detection is a milestone along the way to the possible discovery of another kind of B-mode signal in the polarised CMB - a signal produced by gravitational waves less than a second after the Universe began.



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Engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA

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Similar to using Python or Java to write code for a computer, chemists soon could be able to use a structured set of instructions to "program" how DNA molecules interact in a test tube or cell.



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How engineers revamped Spitzer to probe exoplanets

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(Phys.org) —Now approaching its 10th anniversary, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has evolved into a premier observatory for an endeavor not envisioned in its original design: the study of worlds around other stars, called exoplanets. While the engineers and scientists who built Spitzer did not have this goal in mind, their visionary work made this unexpected capability possible. Thanks to the extraordinary stability of its design and a series of subsequent engineering reworks, the space telescope now has observational powers far beyond its original limits and expectations.



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Nanofabrication: Medical sensors improve with holey gold nanostructures

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Recent advances in nanotechnology are providing new possibilities for medical imaging and sensing. Gold nanostructures, for example, can enhance the fluorescence of marker dyes that are commonly used to detect biomolecules and diagnose specific diseases.



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Clues to the growth of the colossus in Coma

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A team of astronomers has discovered enormous arms of hot gas in the Coma cluster of galaxies by using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA's XMM-Newton. These features, which span at least half a million light years, provide insight into how the Coma cluster has grown through mergers of smaller groups and clusters of galaxies to become one of the largest structures in the Universe held together by gravity.



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Interstellar Poster-Map - High Frontier solitaire

Here's a great poster featuring a beautiful image from deep space

after scouring the Zazzle market place for a while, I settled on this as my choice for today. By SierraMadreGames,
another talented creative from the Zazzle community!


tagged with: high frontier, colonization, interstellar, solitaire, eklund, sierra madre, starship, astronomy, alpha centauri

Updated Aug 2013. This map, together with the High Frontier Colonization boardgame and free rules available by writing phileklund@gmail.com, enables you to travel to all the stars within a dozen light years with a starship of your design and a crew of your choice. This can be a "post-script" to a multi-player Colonization Game, or as a solitaire game. To journey to the stars, you will need a good starship engine, the right team of humans and robot supports, and enough fuel “decatanks” (i.e. fuel tanks ten times normal mass) to speed up to cruising speed and then to slow to a dead stop at the destination. Your pilots have the special ability to brake the starship without using fuel, by drogue braking at gas giants, heliopause bow shock surfing on the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC), using antimatter-fueled beam-core rockets, or using interplanetary magnetic fields. Your scientists dream up new ideas, which your engineers make into reality using 3D printers and nano-configuration refineries. Your engineers also repair dust and radiation damage, while your entrepreneurs keep the passengers sane with products and services. Marriages help reduce stress and provide for the next generation. Raygun crew are able to beam-push ultralight probes, either to potential destinations or back to Earth for help. Spacewalkers fix punctured radiators and land on planets to explore them. However the passengers both age and accumulate stress, and can mutiny if not aligned with the politics. Radiation can interfere with reproduction and increase cancer enough to turn your starship into a ghost ship.

»visit the SierraMadreGames store for more designs and products like this
Click to customize with size, paper type etc.
via Zazzle Astronomy market place

Metal Earth Globe Room Graphic

Here's a great wall decal featuring a beautiful image from deep space

so many products with fantastic designs on Zazzle... which to choose today? How about this one from packratgraphics,
another talented creative from the Zazzle community!


tagged with: earth, planets, planet earth, earth space, space, astronomy, science fiction, digital, earth pictures, sci-fi, 3d earth, planetary earth, science, earth from space, earth and space, earth picture, pictures of earth, earth care, solar system, outer space, planetary, universe, globe, earth globe, global, world, scifi

Shiny wire frame metal Earth globe with blue space nebula background.

»visit the packratgraphics store for more designs and products like this
Click to customize.
via Zazzle Astronomy market place

Emission Nebula NGC 2467 in Constellation Puppis Stickers

Here's a great sheet of stickers featuring a beautiful image from deep space


tagged with: peel off, galaxies and stars, sculptured gas clouds, enebicp, constellation puppis, ngc 2467, the stern, hot young stars, star incubator

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series A colourful star-forming region is featured in this stunning image of NGC 2467 located in the southern constellation of Puppis (The Stern). Looking like a roiling cauldron of some exotic cosmic brew, huge clouds of gas and dust are sprinkled with bright blue, hot young stars. Strangely shaped dust clouds, resembling spilled liquids, are silhouetted against a colourful background of glowing gas. Like the familiar Orion Nebula, NGC 2467 is a huge cloud of gas, mostly hydrogen, that serves as an incubator for new stars. Some of these youthful stars have emerged from the dense clouds where they were born and now shine brightly, hot and blue in this picture, but many others remain hidden.

more items with this image
more items in the Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series

image code: enebicp

Image credit: NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

»visit the HightonRidley store for more designs and products like this
Click to customize.
via Zazzle Astronomy market place

New theory to explain seeds of life in asteroids

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A new look at the early solar system introduces an alternative to a long-taught, but largely discredited, theory that seeks to explain how biomolecules were once able to form inside of asteroids.

via Science Daily

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Sensor provides new approach to molecule detection on silicon surfaces

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Alastair McLean and Benedict Drevniok from the Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy and their collaborators have found a way to "feel" the surface of silicon molecules at the molecular level.



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Evidence for densest galaxy in nearby universe

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Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory and telescopes on the ground may have found the most crowded galaxy in our part of the universe.



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Final antenna delivered to ALMA: All 66 ALMA antennas now handed over to observatory

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The final antenna for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) project has just been handed over to the ALMA Observatory.

via Science Daily

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Researchers devise means to combine scanning tunneling microscopy and infrared spectroscopy

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(Phys.org) —A team of researchers at the University of California with members also from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Stanford University has succeeded in combining tunneling microscopy and infrared spectroscopy to gain a better understanding of how molecules behave when they stick to a surface. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes how they used a custom built laser to allow for performing infrared spectroscopy with scanning tunneling microscopy without heating its tip.



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Tiny antennas let long light waves see in infrared

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(Phys.org) —University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have developed arrays of tiny nano-antennas that can enable sensing of molecules that resonate in the infrared (IR) spectrum.



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Physicists use blind quantum computing to verify results of quantum computer

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(Phys.org) —A team of researchers working at the University of Vienna, has developed a technique for verifying results produced by a quantum computer. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the researchers explain how their method uses one simple quantum computer to verify results produced by another that is far more powerful.



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Researchers publish enormous catalog of more than 300,000 nearby galaxies

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More than 83,000 volunteer citizen scientists. Over 16 million galaxy classifications. Information on more than 300,000 galaxies. This is what you get when you ask the public for help in learning more about our universe.



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Simulations help researchers decide which technology would make a better solar collector, quantum dot or nanowire

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A trio of researchers at North Dakota State University and the University of South Dakota have turned to computer modeling to help decide which of two competing materials should get its day in the sun as the nanoscale energy-harvesting technology of future solar panels—quantum dots or nanowires.



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Spinning CDs to clean sewage water

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Audio CDs, all the rage in the '90s, seem increasingly obsolete in a world of MP3 files and iPods, leaving many music lovers with the question of what to do with their extensive compact disk collections. While you could turn your old disks into a work of avant-garde art, researchers in Taiwan have come up with a more practical application: breaking down sewage. The team will present its new wastewater treatment device at the Optical Society's (OSA) Annual Meeting, Frontiers in Optics (FiO) 2013, being held Oct. 6-10 in Orlando, Fla.



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Researchers make headway in quantum information transfer via nanomechanical coupling

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Fiber optics has made communication faster than ever, but the next step involves a quantum leap –– literally. In order to improve the security of the transfer of information, scientists are working on how to translate electrical quantum states to optical quantum states in a way that would enable ultrafast, quantum-encrypted communications.



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Carbon nanotube logic device operates on subnanowatt power

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(Phys.org) —Researchers have demonstrated a new carbon nanotube (CNT)-based logic device that consumes just 0.1 nanowatts (nW) in its static ON and OFF states, representing the lowest reported value by 3 orders of magnitude for CNT-based CMOS logic devices. The device could serve as a building block for large-area, ultralow-power CNT logic circuits that can be used to realize a variety of nanoelectronics applications.



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Simulation sets atoms shivering

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(Phys.org) —In "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" (JK Rowling, 1997), Harry, Ron, and Hermione encounter a massive stone chessboard, one of many obstacles in their path. To advance, they must play, and win. Although the board and pieces are much larger than normal, and the circumstances a bit peculiar, one thing remains clear to them—this is a game of chess, with the same rules as always.



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Hubble eyes a smoldering star

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(Phys.org) —This new image, snapped by NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the star HD 184738, also known as Campbell's hydrogen star. It is surrounded by plumes of reddish gas—the fiery red and orange hues are caused by glowing gases, including hydrogen and nitrogen.



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Galaxy winds

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(Phys.org) —The most luminous galaxies in our universe are not particularly bright in the visible. Most of their energy output (which can be hundreds or even thousands of times more than our Milky Way's) is emitted at infrared wavelengths. The power source of these galaxies is hyperactive bursts of star formation and/or activity around a massive black hole at a galaxy's nucleus, a so-called active galactic nucleus (AGN). The radiation from these processes is absorbed by dust that then re-emits it in the infrared. Astronomers suspect that many normal galaxies, even including our own, have undergone a phase of luminous activity at some time in their past.



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Dating our galaxy's dormant volcano

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(Phys.org) —A dormant volcano—a supermassive black hole—lies at the heart of our galaxy. Fresh evidence suggests that it last erupted two million years ago.



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Promising new alloy for resistive switching memory

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Memory based on electrically-induced "resistive switching" effects have generated a great deal of interest among engineers searching for faster and smaller devices because resistive switching would allow for a higher memory density.



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Densest array of carbon nanotubes grown to date

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Carbon nanotubes' outstanding mechanical, electrical and thermal properties make them an alluring material to electronics manufacturers. However, until recently scientists believed that growing the high density of tiny graphene cylinders needed for many microelectronics applications would be difficult.



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'Waviness' explains why carbon nanotube forests have low stiffness

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A new study has found that “waviness” in forests of carbon nanotubes dramatically reduces their stiffness. Instead of being a detriment, the waviness may make the nanotube arrays more useful as thermal interface material for conducting heat away from integrated circuits.

via Science Daily

Crystal quantum memories for quantum communication

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Research into the strange phenomenon known as quantum entanglement - once described as 'spooky' by Albert Einstein - could revolutionise ICT over the coming years, enabling everything from ultra-fast computing to completely secure long-distance communications. EU-funded researchers are carrying out cutting-edge work on quantum technologies, with one team recently demonstrating a key breakthrough in extending the range of quantum communications.



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Goodbye Big Bang, hello black hole? A new theory of the universe's creation

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Could the famed "Big Bang" theory need a revision? A group of theoretical physicists suppose the birth of the universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris.



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Beyond quantum simulation: Physicists create 'crystal' of spin-swapping ultracold molecules

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Physicists at JILA have created a crystal-like arrangement of ultracold gas molecules that can swap quantum "spin" properties with nearby and distant partners. The novel structure might be used to simulate or even invent new materials that derive exotic properties from quantum spin behavior, for electronics or other practical applications.



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Hubble Image iPad Case

Here's a great iPad case from Zazzle featuring a Hubble-related design. Maybe you'd like to see your name on it? Click to personalize and see what it's like!

what do you think of this one? I bumped into it and thought it was cool. By themilkyway,
another talented creative from the Zazzle community!


tagged with: hubble image, hubble satellite, galaxy, galaxies, planets, galactic, nasa images, nasa, nebula, galactic clouds, gaseous, solar system, universe, stars, bright stars

.

»visit the themilkyway store for more designs and products like this
The Zazzle Promise: We promise 100% satisfaction. If you don't absolutely love it, we'll take it back!

Researchers reveal Earth's habitable lifetime and investigate potential for alien life

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Habitable conditions on Earth will be possible for at least another 1.75 billion years – according to astrobiologists at the University of East Anglia.



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Young stars cooking in the Prawn Nebula

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The glowing jumble of gas clouds visible in this new image make up a huge stellar nursery nicknamed the Prawn Nebula. Taken using the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile, this may well be the sharpest picture ever taken of this object. It shows clumps of hot new-born stars nestled in among the clouds that make up the nebula.



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On the road to fault-tolerant quantum computing: High temperature superconductivity in a toplogical insulator

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Reliable quantum computing would make it possible to solve certain types of extremely complex technological problems millions of times faster than today's most powerful supercomputers. Other types of problems that quantum computing could tackle would not even be feasible with today's fastest machines. The key word is "reliable." If the enormous potential of quantum computing is to be fully realized, scientists must learn to create "fault-tolerant" quantum computers. A small but important step toward this goal has been achieved by an international collaboration of researchers from China's Tsinghua University and the DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) working at the Advanced Light Source (ALS).



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Quantum entanglement only dependent upon area

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Two researchers at UCL Computer Science and the University of Gdansk present a new method for determining the amount of entanglement – a quantum phenomenon connecting two remote partners, and crucial for quantum technology - within part of a one-dimensional quantum system.



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Qcloud project to allow online users a taste of quantum computing

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Officials with Bristol University in the U.K. have announced at this year's British Science Festival, that they intend to put their two-quantum bit (qubit) processor online for use by some people on the Internet. Called the Qcloud project, the idea is to get scientists, those in academics and even the general public used to the idea of quantum computing so as to be prepared when real quantum computers arrive.



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Graphene with aroma: New production method broadens prospects for 'magic' material

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New production method broadens the prospects for an improved use of the "magic material" -- many different forms are possible.

via Science Daily

Researchers create image of weak hydrogen bond using AFM

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(Phys.org) —Researchers at China's National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Renmin University have used Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to create an image of the weak hydrogen bonds present in a molecule. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they used the non-contact form of AFM to capture an image of weak hydrogen bonds in a 8-hydroxyquinoline molecule (8hq).



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More accurate estimate of amount of water on surface layer of Mars

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NASA's rover Curiosity, which landed on the surface of Mars on 6 August 2012, has led to more detailed estimates of the amount of water on the Martian surface.

via Science Daily

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Herschel helps find elusive signals from the early Universe

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Using a telescope in Antarctica and ESA’s Herschel space observatory, astronomers have made the first detection of a subtle twist in the relic radiation from the Big Bang, paving the way towards revealing the first moments of the Universe’s existence.




via ESA Space Science

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Herschel/Herschel_helps_find_elusive_signals_from_the_early_Universe

New kind of 'X-ray/CT vision' reveals objects' internal nanoscale structure, chemistry

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(Phys.org) —Nanomaterials made of particles with dimensions measured in billionths of a meter hold enormous promise for creating more efficient batteries, fuel cells, catalysts, and drug-delivery systems. Seeing how the nanostructured materials inside these devices evolve and interact as they operate is essential to gain insight into ways to optimize performance. But most studies have looked at idealized samples of isolated components, not as they function in operating devices.



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Monogram - Emission Nebula NGC 2467 in Puppis Round Stickers

Here's a great sheet of stickers featuring a beautiful image from deep space


tagged with: envelope sealers, galaxies and stars, sculptured gas clouds, enebicp, constellation puppis, ngc 2467, the stern, hot young stars, star incubator, monogram initials

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series A colourful star-forming region is featured in this stunning image of NGC 2467 located in the southern constellation of Puppis (The Stern). Looking like a roiling cauldron of some exotic cosmic brew, huge clouds of gas and dust are sprinkled with bright blue, hot young stars. Strangely shaped dust clouds, resembling spilled liquids, are silhouetted against a colourful background of glowing gas. Like the familiar Orion Nebula, NGC 2467 is a huge cloud of gas, mostly hydrogen, that serves as an incubator for new stars. Some of these youthful stars have emerged from the dense clouds where they were born and now shine brightly, hot and blue in this picture, but many others remain hidden.

more items with this image
more items in the Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series

image code: enebicp

Image credit: NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

»visit the HightonRidley store for more designs and products like this
Click to customize.
via Zazzle Astronomy market place

Graphene cleans, drives, and repels water

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Water is essential for life. In humans, water forms about 60% of body volume, acting both as a solvent for nutrients and as the delivering mechanism of those nutrients to cells. The human body generally needs replenishment from a clean water source on a daily basis, which causes problems in remote and poor locations. More generally, water serves a variety of functions in different living organisms, like for example in self-hygiene of a lotus leaf. Engineers and scientists are now studying how water interacts with surfaces and chemicals, and how we can engineer those interactions for the benefit of human health and world energy. Naturally, with its strong hydrophobic nature, graphene has found its own uses in water engineering.



Photo: The surface of a lotus leaf is hydrophobic. The leaf is shaped such that droplets of water that fall on it pick up dirt as they roll off the leaf, cleaning the plant. Now researchers have shown a similar effect on a graphene surface. Courtesy of sxc.hu.


In recent research performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, scientists have shown that covering a rough surface with a layer of graphene reduces the sticking of water droplets on that surface. As opposed to bare rough surfaces on which water tends to pin to the crevices, a graphene-coated surface is smooth and hydrophobic, allowing water droplets to glide away from the material, similar to the lotus leaf effect found in nature. For their research, published in the journal ACS Nano, the researchers used a monolayer graphene sheet grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred to the target rough surface using a polymer film. The CVD growth process and graphene transfer are Graphenea's specialties, and if you wish to have large-area high-quality graphene on a custom substrate, please contact us by email.


Interestingly, also recently, scientists at the US Naval Research Lab (NRL) have shown that they can guide water droplets in a desired direction on a graphene surface. This new achievement offers potential applications ranging from electronics to mechanical resonators to bio/chemical sensors. For example, the ability to guide small amounts of liquids to a desired location on a chip is the motivation of the burgeoning technology of microfluidics. Microfluidic chips are being used as biosensors for various diseases, and can be used as sensors for dangerous chemicals. In the work performed at NRL, also published in ACS Nano, the graphene surface was modified with a chemical gradient, induced by a clever modification of plasma-doping. The chemical gradient also creates a potential gradient which pulls the droplets in a pre-specified direction. It will be interesting to see whether this work can be extended to dynamical gradients through, for example, electrostatic gating. Such research would open up the way to real-time control of the motion of liquids on a surface.


Both mentioned works used high-speed cameras to record the motion of water on graphene, and ACS Nano offers open access to the “supplementary information” section where you can see the cool movies.


Graphene, as part of a composite nanomaterial that also includes carbon nanotubes and iron oxide, is also good for cleansing water of the dangerous chemical arsenic. The work of the Graphene Research Center in KAIST in Korea was just published in Environmental Science and Technology (also an ACS publication). The advanced material has a carefully engineered structure, consisting of a graphene layer, covered with upright carbon nanotubes, which are topped by iron oxide molecules. The iron oxide has a magnetic function, but apart from that also shows a high affinity for arsenic. A solution containing the nanomaterial was shown to efficiently extract arsenic from contaminated water. Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a critical problem that affects millions of people across the world and results in severe diseases such as skin or lung cancer and bladder cancer.


Graphene is indeed entering the world of water manipulation and water filtration, which we see as a welcome addition to the many outstanding applications that we expect from graphene. We will continue to monitor the progress of this field. Graphenea also welcomes potential collaboration with researchers.




via Graphenea

Neptune NASA Planet Print

Here's a great poster featuring a beautiful image from deep space

so many products with fantastic designs on Zazzle... which to choose today? How about this one from AstronomyGiftShop,
another talented creative from the Zazzle community!


tagged with: neptune, neptune photo, picture of neptune, planet, solar system, neptune planet, nasa, planetary, nature, neptune voyager, cosmos, cosmic, universe, astronomy, astronomical, cosmology, space picture, space image, space, natural, science, space gifts, astronomy gifts, space products, astronomy products, cool astronomy, cool space, blue, neptunian, outer planets, blue planet, neptune blue, neptune full disk

This is a NASA photograph of the planet Neptune. It was taken by the Voyager 2 mission, in 1989. In this image, the planet has a beautiful deep blue colour, and the Great Dark Spot is visible.

Credit: NASA

There are more products with this space photograph in The Astronomy Gift Shop store.

»visit the AstronomyGiftShop store for more designs and products like this
Click to customize with size, paper type etc.
via Zazzle Astronomy market place

Metal Earth Globe Wall Graphic

Here's a great wall decal featuring a beautiful image from deep space

sometimes it's difficult to choose what to feature from amongst the fantastic designs on Zazzle. I finally settled on this great design by packratgraphics,
another talented creative from the Zazzle community!


tagged with: earth, planets, planet earth, earth space, space, astronomy, science fiction, digital, earth pictures, space art, 3d earth, planetary earth, science, earth from space, earth and space, earth picture, pictures of earth, earth care, solar system, outer space, planetary, universe, globe, earth globe, global, world, sci-fi, scifi, nebula, space nebula

Shiny wire frame metal Earth globe with red space nebula background.

»visit the packratgraphics store for more designs and products like this
Click to customize.
via Zazzle Astronomy market place

Space telescopes find patchy clouds on exotic world

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(Phys.org) —Astronomers using data from NASA's Kepler and Spitzer space telescopes have created the first cloud map of a planet beyond our solar system, a sizzling, Jupiter-like world known as Kepler-7b.



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Hubbles First Servicing Cover For iPad

Here's a great iPad case from Zazzle featuring a Hubble-related design. Maybe you'd like to see your name on it? Click to personalize and see what it's like!

it's always a pleasure to choose a design from themilkyway,
another talented creative from the Zazzle community!


tagged with: hubbles first servicing, first servicing, hubble, hubble telescope, space telescope, space images, space, galaxy, astronaut, stars, universe, earth, outerspace

.

»visit the themilkyway store for more designs and products like this
The Zazzle Promise: We promise 100% satisfaction. If you don't absolutely love it, we'll take it back!

First cloud map of a planet beyond our solar system

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Astronomers using data from NASA's Kepler and Spitzer space telescopes have created the first cloud map of a planet beyond our solar system, a sizzling, Jupiter-like world known as Kepler-7b. The planet is marked by high clouds in the west and clear skies in the east. Previous studies from Spitzer have resulted in temperature maps of planets orbiting other stars, but this is the first look at cloud structures on a distant world.

via Science Daily

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Ingredient of household plastic found in space

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NASA's Cassini spacecraft has detected propylene, a chemical used to make food-storage containers, car bumpers and other consumer products, on Saturn's moon Titan. This is the first definitive detection of the plastic ingredient on any moon or planet, other than Earth.

via Science Daily

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