Tuesday, 15 October 2013

Herschel throws new light on oldest cosmic light

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(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have achieved a first detection of a long-sought component in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This component, known as B-mode polarisation, is caused by gravitational lensing, the bending of light by massive structures as it travels across the Universe. The result is based on the combination of data from the South Pole Telescope and ESA's Herschel Space Observatory. This detection is a milestone along the way to the possible discovery of another kind of B-mode signal in the polarised CMB - a signal produced by gravitational waves less than a second after the Universe began.



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Physicists 'entangle' microscopic drum's beat with electrical signals

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Extending evidence of quantum behavior farther into the large-scale world of everyday life, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have "entangled"—linked the properties of—a microscopic mechanical drum with electrical signals.



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Reexamination of Allende meteorite reveals isotopic evidence of supernova

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(Phys.org) —A combined team of researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Arizona State University has found isotopic evidence of a supernova inside of a meteorite that fell to Earth in 1969. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, the team describes how isotopes found in the Allende meteorite differ from those found on Earth or on the moon, suggesting they came directly from a supernova rather than from a debris field that followed.



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Research maps where stars are born

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(Phys.org) —A University of Arizona-led group of astronomers has completed the largest-ever survey of dense gas clouds in the Milky Way – pockets shrouded in gas and dust where new stars are being born.



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The power of one: Single photons illuminate quantum technology

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Quantum mechanics, which aims to describe the nano-scale world around us, has already led to the development of many technologies ubiquitous in modern life, including broadband optical fibre communication and smartphone displays.



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Found: Planets skimming a star's surface

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A new planet-hunting survey has revealed planetary candidates with orbital periods as short as four hours and so close to their host stars that they are nearly skimming the stellar surface. If confirmed, these candidates would be among the closest planets to their stars discovered so far. Brian Jackson of the Carnegie Institution for Science's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism presented his team's findings, which are based on data from NASA's Kepler mission, at the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences meeting.



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Mix of graphene nanoribbons, polymer has potential for cars, soda, beer

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A discovery at Rice University aims to make vehicles that run on compressed natural gas more practical. It might also prolong the shelf life of bottled beer and soda.



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Watery asteroid discovered in dying star points to habitable exoplanets

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Astronomers have found the shattered remains of an asteroid that contained huge amounts of water orbiting an exhausted star, or white dwarf. This suggests that the star GD 61 and its planetary system – located about 150 light years away and at the end of its life – had the potential to contain Earth-like exoplanets, they say.



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Researchers devise a means to observe single quantum trajectory of superconducting quantum bit

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(Phys.org) —A team of physicists at the University of California has devised a means for allowing the observation of the quantum trajectory of a superconducting quantum bit. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they used a three dimensional transmon and microwaves to observe the random path of a quantum state as it collapsed from its superposition state to a classically permitted state.



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Soft shells and strange star clusters

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The beautiful, petal-like shells of galaxy PGC 6240 are captured here in intricate detail by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, set against a sky full of distant background galaxies. This cosmic bloom is of great interest to astronomers due to both its uneven structure, and the unusual clusters of stars that orbit around it—two strong indications of a galactic merger in the recent past.



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Direct 'writing' of artificial cell membranes on graphene

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Graphene emerges as a versatile new surface to assemble model cell membranes mimicking those in the human body, with potential for applications in sensors for understanding biological processes, disease detection and drug screening.



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A strange lonely planet found without a star

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(Phys.org) —An international team of astronomers has discovered an exotic young planet that is not orbiting a star. This free-floating planet, dubbed PSO J318.5-22, is just 80 light-years away from Earth and has a mass only six times that of Jupiter. The planet formed a mere 12 million years ago—a newborn in planet lifetimes.



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Carbon's new champion: Theorists calculate atom-thick carbyne chains may be strongest material ever

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(Phys.org) —Carbyne will be the strongest of a new class of microscopic materials if and when anyone can make it in bulk.



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Future phones and laptops could have speakers made of carbon nanotubes

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(Phys.org) —For the past year, researchers at Tsinghua University in Beijing have been listening to music on a laptop through a pair of unusual earphones. Although the earphones look ordinary, they do not contain the typical metal coil speaker found in most earphones, but rather a chip made of many string-like carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with grooves etched in them. Because they are easy to fabricate, operate on 60 mW of power, and provide clear sound quality, the CNT-based chips could be used as components in a wide variety of speakers, including those found in cell phones and laptops.



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Archival Hubble images reveal Neptune's 'lost' inner moon

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(Phys.org) —Neptune's tiny, innermost moon, Naiad, has now been seen for the first time since it was discovered by Voyager's cameras in 1989. Dr. Mark Showalter, a senior research scientist at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, announced the result today in Denver, Colorado, at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society. He and collaborators Dr. Jack Lissauer of the NASA Ames Research Center, Dr. Imke de Pater of UC Berkeley, and Robert French of the SETI Institute, also released a dramatic new image of Neptune's puzzling rings and ring-arcs, which were first imaged by Voyager.



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Ultrafast laser pulses and precisely cut optical crystals could control quantum properties of light

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Quantum optics scientists and engineers are striving to harness the properties of small packets of light called photons to improve communications and computational devices. Vital to these efforts is an invisible connection between pairs of photons; understanding this effect is therefore crucial. By mapping the connections, researchers at the A*STAR Data Storage Institute, Singapore, and in Russia have shown that the properties of each photon in a pair, which were created in the same time and place, are governed by statistics. The maps could aid future quantum optics engineering efforts.



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Scientists take a quieter step closer to first practical quantum computer

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(Phys.org) —Scientists working to produce the world's fastest, most powerful computers have moved a step closer to creating a practical prototype using microwaves – by shielding the atoms driving this new generation of computers from the harmful effects of noise.



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A close look at the Toby Jug Nebula

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ESO's Very Large Telescope has captured a remarkably detailed image of the Toby Jug Nebula, a cloud of gas and dust surrounding a red giant star. This view shows the characteristic arcing structure of the nebula, which, true to its name, does indeed look a little like a jug with a handle.



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Folding batteries increases their areal energy density by up to 14 times

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(Phys.org) —By folding a paper-based Li-ion battery in a Miura-ori pattern (similar to how some maps are folded), scientists have shown that the battery exhibits a 14x increase in areal energy density and capacity due to its smaller footprint. Paper-based batteries are already attractive due to their low cost, roll-to-roll fabrication methods, and flexibility. The advantages of folding them into smaller sizes adds to these features and could lead to high-performance batteries for various applications.



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ALMA discovers large 'hot' cocoon around a small baby star

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International research team, led by researcher at the University of Electro-Communication observed an infrared dark cloud G34.43+00.24 MM3 with ALMA and discovered a baby star surrounded by a large hot cloud. This hot cloud is about ten times larger than those found around typical solar-mass baby stars. Hot molecular clouds around new-born stars are called "Hot Cores" and have temperature of – 160 degrees Celsius, 100 degrees hotter than normal molecular clouds. The large size of the hot core discovered by ALMA shows that much more energy is emitted from the central baby star than typical solar-mass young stars. This may be due to the higher mass infall rate, or multiplicity of the central baby star. This result indicates a large diversity in the star formation process.



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Researchers find that bright nearby double star Fomalhaut is actually a triple

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(Phys.org) —The nearby star system Fomalhaut – of special interest for its unusual exoplanet and dusty debris disk – has been discovered to be not just a double star, as astronomers had thought, but one of the widest triple stars known.



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New biomimetic material to develop nanosensors

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The new features of this biomimetic material will allow us to develop multiple nanometer-sized chemical sensors over the same substrate by electron beam lithography, as a result, multifunctional biochips of major versatility will be developed. The possibility to record at nanometric scale is an essential benefit facing traditional biomimetic materials since this new material developed by researchers at the Universidad Polit├ęcnica de Madrid (UPM) and the Universidad Complutense (UCM) within the framework of Moncloa campus provides commercial potential applications.



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Researchers apply transmission electron microscopy through unique graphene liquid cell (w/ Video)

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(Phys.org) —Autumn is usually not such a great time for big special effects movies as the summer blockbusters have faded and those for the holiday season have not yet opened. Fall is more often the time for thoughtful films about small subjects, which makes it perfect for the unveiling of a new movie produced by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Through a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their own unique graphene liquid cell, the researchers have recorded the three-dimensional motion of DNA connected to gold nanocrystals. This is the first time TEM has been used for 3D dynamic imaging of so-called soft materials.



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Graphene-based discs ensure safe storage

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(Phys.org) —Swinburne University of Technology researchers have shown the potential of a new material for transforming secure optical information storage.



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Astronomers observe distant galaxy powered by primordial cosmic fuel

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(Phys.org) —Astronomers have detected cold streams of primordial hydrogen, vestigial matter left over from the Big Bang, fueling a distant star-forming galaxy in the early Universe. Profuse flows of gas onto galaxies are believed to be crucial for explaining an era 10 billion years ago, when galaxies were copiously forming stars. To make this discovery, the astronomers – led by Neil Crighton of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and Swinburne University – made use of a cosmic coincidence: a bright, distant quasar acting as a "cosmic lighthouse" illuminates the gas flow from behind. The results were published October 2 in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.



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Diamond 'super-Earth' may not be quite as precious, graduate student finds

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(Phys.org) —An alien world reported to be the first known planet to consist largely of diamond appears less likely to be of such precious nature, according to a new analysis led by UA graduate student Johanna Teske.



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In quantum computing, light may lead the way

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(Phys.org) —Light might be able to play a bigger, more versatile role in the future of quantum computing, according to new research by Yale University scientists.



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New microfluidic approach for the directed assembly of functional materials

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(Phys.org) —Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new approach with applications in materials development for energy capture and storage and for optoelectronic materials.



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Physicists find that entanglement concentration is irreversible, in contrast with previous research

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(Phys.org) —Several different types of entangled states can be used in quantum information processes, and these states can be converted into one another using a variety of conversion processes. While previous research has suggested that one of the most common types of conversions, called entanglement concentration, is reversible, a new paper shows for the first time that it is irreversible due to a trade-off relation between performance and reversibility. The finding could have implications for future developments in quantum information applications.



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Crab Pulsar Time Lapse - Neutron Star Square Stickers

Here's a great sheet of stickers featuring a beautiful image from deep space


tagged with: stars, galaxies, astronomy, envelope sealers, crbplsr, crab pulsar, time lapse astronomy, neutron star, matter and antimatter, near light speed

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Multiple observations made over several months with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope captured the spectacle of matter and antimatter propelled to near the speed of light by the Crab pulsar, a rapidly rotating neutron star the size of Manhattan.

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Image credit: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope

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Runaway binary stars

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CfA astronomers made a remarkable and fortuitous discovery in 2005: an extremely fast moving star, clocked going over three million kilometers an hour. It appears to have been ejected from the vicinity of the galactic center's supermassive black hole around 80 million years ago by powerful gravitational effects as it swung past the black hole. Racing outward from the galaxy, the star lends added credibility to the picture of a massive black hole at the galactic center, and to calculations of how black holes might interact with their stellar environments.



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Scientists observe competing quantum effects on the kinetic energy of protons in water

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(Phys.org) —Quantum mechanics plays an important role in determining the structure and dynamics of water, down to the level of the atomic nuclei. Sometimes, nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) along different molecular axes compete with each other and partially cancel each other out. This phenomenon is thought to play a role in determining the melting and boiling temperatures of water. Now for the first time, scientists have experimentally observed that two large components of NQEs partially cancel each other out to result in a small net effect on the melting and boiling points of water.



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Bending world's thinnest glass shows atoms' dance

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Watch what happens when you bend and break the world's thinnest glass. This glass was recently featured in the Guinness Book of World Records and is made of the same compounds as everyday windowpanes. used an electron microscope to bend, deform and melt the one-molecule-thick glass. These are all things that happen just before glass shatters, and for the first time, the researchers have directly imaged such deformations and the resulting “dance” of rearranging atoms in silica glass.

via Science Daily

Scientists bend world's thinnest glass and see atoms dance

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Watch what happens when the world’s thinnest sheet of glass breaks. Well, not exactly breaks, but close to it. Scientists have used an electron microscope to bend, deform and melt one molecule-thick glass. These are all things that happen just before glass shatters, and for the first time, the researchers have directly imaged such deformations and the resulting “dance” of rearranging atoms in silica glass, which forms the basis for everyday windowpanes.

via Science Daily

Physicists use blind quantum computing to verify results of quantum computer

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(Phys.org) —A team of researchers working at the University of Vienna, has developed a technique for verifying results produced by a quantum computer. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the researchers explain how their method uses one simple quantum computer to verify results produced by another that is far more powerful.



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Scientists directly observe bound states of elementary magnets in ferromagnetic quantum crystals

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Simulating solid state properties with precisely controlled quantum systems is an important goal of the Quantum Many-Body Systems Division at MPQ. Now the team around Professor Immanuel Bloch (Chair for Experimental Physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit├Ąt Munich and Director at MPQ) has come again a step closer to it – to be precise, to the understanding of processes in ferromagnetic solid state crystals in which elementary excitations, so-called magnons, can emerge. About 80 years ago the German physicist Hans Bethe deduced from a theoretical model that in one-dimensional ferromagnets two of those elementary magnetic excitations can form a bound state. Like two tiny bar magnets, two atoms can stick together and form a new particle that propagates in the crystal. The MPQ team has now succeeded to observe these most elementary mobile magnetic domains, the two-magnon states, directly and to resolve their dynamics with time-resolved measurements. This study complements conventional spectroscopy in solid state crystals which yields information on momentum and frequency of the magnetic excitations. Bound states of excitations can influence the thermal conductance properties of low-dimensional ferromagnets or the propagation speed of quantum information in magnetic wires.



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Scientists create never-before-seen form of matter

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Harvard and MIT scientists are challenging the conventional wisdom about light, and they didn't need to go to a galaxy far, far away to do it.



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Researchers make headway in quantum information transfer via nanomechanical coupling

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Fiber optics has made communication faster than ever, but the next step involves a quantum leap –– literally. In order to improve the security of the transfer of information, scientists are working on how to translate electrical quantum states to optical quantum states in a way that would enable ultrafast, quantum-encrypted communications.



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Simulation sets atoms shivering

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(Phys.org) —In "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" (JK Rowling, 1997), Harry, Ron, and Hermione encounter a massive stone chessboard, one of many obstacles in their path. To advance, they must play, and win. Although the board and pieces are much larger than normal, and the circumstances a bit peculiar, one thing remains clear to them—this is a game of chess, with the same rules as always.



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Crystal quantum memories for quantum communication

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Research into the strange phenomenon known as quantum entanglement - once described as 'spooky' by Albert Einstein - could revolutionise ICT over the coming years, enabling everything from ultra-fast computing to completely secure long-distance communications. EU-funded researchers are carrying out cutting-edge work on quantum technologies, with one team recently demonstrating a key breakthrough in extending the range of quantum communications.



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Beyond quantum simulation: Physicists create 'crystal' of spin-swapping ultracold molecules

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Physicists at JILA have created a crystal-like arrangement of ultracold gas molecules that can swap quantum "spin" properties with nearby and distant partners. The novel structure might be used to simulate or even invent new materials that derive exotic properties from quantum spin behavior, for electronics or other practical applications.



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On the road to fault-tolerant quantum computing: High temperature superconductivity in a toplogical insulator

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Reliable quantum computing would make it possible to solve certain types of extremely complex technological problems millions of times faster than today's most powerful supercomputers. Other types of problems that quantum computing could tackle would not even be feasible with today's fastest machines. The key word is "reliable." If the enormous potential of quantum computing is to be fully realized, scientists must learn to create "fault-tolerant" quantum computers. A small but important step toward this goal has been achieved by an international collaboration of researchers from China's Tsinghua University and the DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) working at the Advanced Light Source (ALS).



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Quantum entanglement only dependent upon area

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Two researchers at UCL Computer Science and the University of Gdansk present a new method for determining the amount of entanglement – a quantum phenomenon connecting two remote partners, and crucial for quantum technology - within part of a one-dimensional quantum system.



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Qcloud project to allow online users a taste of quantum computing

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Officials with Bristol University in the U.K. have announced at this year's British Science Festival, that they intend to put their two-quantum bit (qubit) processor online for use by some people on the Internet. Called the Qcloud project, the idea is to get scientists, those in academics and even the general public used to the idea of quantum computing so as to be prepared when real quantum computers arrive.



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Teleportation with engineered quantum systems

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A team of University of Queensland physicists has transmitted an atom from one location to another inside an electronic chip.



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Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical the quantum world

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How does a classical temperature form in the quantum world? An experiment at the Vienna University of Technology has directly observed the emergence and the spreading of a temperature in a quantum system. Remarkably, the quantum properties are lost, even though the quantum system is completely isolated and not connected to the outside world. The experimental results are being published in this week's issue of Nature Physics.



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Star birth in Carina Nebula from Hubble's WFC3 det Posters

Here's a great poster featuring a beautiful image from deep space

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tagged with: argo navis, astronomy, carina, celestial bodies, exploration, milky way, natural sciences, natural world, nebula, ngc 3372, nobody, outer space, physical science, sciences, space exploration and research, stars

ImageID: 42-23286264 / STScI / NASA/Corbis / Star birth in Carina Nebula from Hubble's WFC3 detector

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Herschel throws new light on oldest cosmic light

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(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have achieved a first detection of a long-sought component in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This component, known as B-mode polarisation, is caused by gravitational lensing, the bending of light by massive structures as it travels across the Universe. The result is based on the combination of data from the South Pole Telescope and ESA's Herschel Space Observatory. This detection is a milestone along the way to the possible discovery of another kind of B-mode signal in the polarised CMB - a signal produced by gravitational waves less than a second after the Universe began.



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Large Magellanic Cloud Superbubble in Nebula N44 Wall Decal

Here's a great wall decal featuring a beautiful image from deep space

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tagged with: awesome astronomy images, interstellar hydrogen clouds, sbsblmc, n44 nebula, star cluster ngc 1929, supernovas, dust clouds, superbubble, star nursery, new born stars

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series An awesome photograph from deep space featuring a super bubble in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which is a small satellite of our Milky Way galaxy around 160000 light years from us.
The massive stars of this nebula produce intense radiation, expelling matter at high speeds, and race through their main stage finally to explode as supernovas. The stellar winds of charged hydrogen and other particles and the supernova shock waves carve out huge cavities called superbubbles in the surrounding gas. Blue shows hot regions created by these winds and shocks, while red shows where the dust and cooler gas are found. Yellow regions show where ultraviolet radiation from hot, young stars is causing gas in the nebula to glow.

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image code: sbsblmc

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/U.Mich./S.Oey, IR: NASA/JPL, Optical: ESO/WFI/2.2-m

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NGC 3314 iPad CASES

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tagged with: ngc 3314,interacting,overlapping,spiral,galaxies,nasa,hubble,space,image

NGC 3314 is a pair of interacting or overlapping spiral galaxies thanks to a June 2012 Hubble NASA space image.

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Crab Pulsar Time Lapse - Neutron Star Stickers

Here's a great sheet of stickers featuring a beautiful image from deep space


tagged with: stars, galaxies, astronomy, crbplsr, crab pulsar, time lapse astronomy, neutron star, matter and antimatter, near light speed

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Multiple observations made over several months with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope captured the spectacle of matter and antimatter propelled to near the speed of light by the Crab pulsar, a rapidly rotating neutron star the size of Manhattan.

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image code: crbplsr

Image credit: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope

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Stonehenge Poster

Here's a great poster featuring a beautiful image from deep space

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tagged with: architecture, astronomy, british isles, england, europe, european, period or style, great britain, henge, megalithic monument, monument, mystery, national monument, natural science, natural sciences, neolithic, nobody, outdoors, physical science, prehistoric, public land, religion, salisbury plain, science, sciences, south west england, stone age, stonehenge, trilithon, western europe, western european, wiltshire

ImageID: CB002359 / Lawrence Manning / Corbis / Stonehenge /

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Ngc 3603 Emission Nebula Wall Stickers

Here's a great wall decal featuring a beautiful image from deep space

sometimes it's difficult to choose what to feature from amongst the fantastic designs on Zazzle. I finally settled on this great design by SpacePhotography,
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tagged with: nebula, space, universe, stars, ngc 3603, emission nebula, galaxy, photo, photography, astronomy, constellation, space photography, nebula photo, night, sky, hubble, hubble photo, telescope, space travel, science

Amazing photo of emission nebula. Great space photography gits.

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Spaced Heart iPad Cases

Here's a great iPad case from Zazzle featuring a Hubble-related design. Maybe you'd like to see your name on it? Click to personalize and see what it's like!

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tagged with: geek, girl, space, science, nebula, hubble, telescope, heart, cool, 80s, nerd, stars, pink, universe, teacher, nebulae

Hubble telescope nebula heart for geek girls

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