Monday, 23 March 2015

Stellar Nursery R136 in the Tarantula Nebula iPad Cases

Here's a great iPad case from Zazzle featuring a Hubble-related design. Maybe you'd like to see your name on it? Click to personalize and see what it's like!


tagged with: astronomy, stellar nursery, massive stars, star cluster, tarantula nebula, hubble, galaxy stars, cosmological, 30 doradus nebula, hrbstslr dorneblmc, large magellanic cloud, r136, amazing hubble images, nebulae

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Hundreds of brilliant blue stars wreathed by warm, glowing clouds in appear in this the most detailed view of the largest stellar nursery in our local galactic neighborhood. The massive, young stellar grouping, called R136, is only a few million years old and resides in the 30 Doradus (or Tarantula) Nebula, a turbulent star-birth region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way.
There is no known star-forming region in our galaxy as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus. Many of the diamond-like icy blue stars are among the most massive stars known. Several of them are over 100 times more massive than our Sun. These hefty stars are destined to pop off, like a string of firecrackers, as supernovas in a few million years. The image, taken in ultraviolet, visible, and red light by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, spans about 100 light-years.
The movement of the LMC around the Milky Way may have triggered the massive cluster's formation in several ways. The gravitational tug of the Milky Way and the companion Small Magellanic Cloud may have compressed gas in the LMC. Also, the pressure resulting from the LMC plowing through the Milky Way's halo may have compressed gas in the satellite. The cluster is a rare, nearby example of the many super star clusters that formed in the distant, early universe, when star birth and galaxy interactions were more frequent.
The LMC is located 170,000 light-years away and is a member of the Local Group of Galaxies, which also includes the Milky Way. The Hubble observations were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen.
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image code: dorneblmc

Image credit: Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3

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Wandering Jupiter accounts for our strange solar system

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Jupiter may have swept through the early solar system like a wrecking ball, destroying a first generation of inner planets before retreating into its current orbit, according to a new study. The findings help explain why our solar system is so different from the hundreds of other planetary systems that astronomers have discovered in recent years.

via Science Daily

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PancakeBot – pancake printing machine that inspires playing with your food

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New technologies have to be useful, make our lives easier and/or be fun. This is exactly what the

The post PancakeBot – pancake printing machine that inspires playing with your food has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Our solar system may have once harbored super-earths: Earth belongs to a second generation of planets

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New calculations and simulations suggest that a number of super-Earths might have once existed in the inner solar system. Where are they now? Their demise cleared the way for the formation of planets like home sweet Earth.

via Science Daily

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Colliding stars explain enigmatic 17th century explosion

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New observations made with APEX and other telescopes reveal that the star that European astronomers saw appear in the sky in 1670 was not a nova, but a much rarer, violent breed of stellar collision. It was spectacular enough to be easily seen with the naked eye during its first outburst, but the traces it left were so faint that very careful analysis using submillimetre telescopes was needed before the mystery could finally be unravelled more than 340 years later. The results appear online in the journal Nature on 23 March 2015.



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Superfast computers a step closer as a silicon chip's quantum capabilities are improved

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Research has demonstrated laser control of quantum states in an ordinary silicon wafer and observation of these states via a conventional electrical measurement. The findings—published in the journal Nature Communications by a UK-Dutch-Swiss team from the University of Surrey, University College London, Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, the Radboud University in Nijmegen, and ETH Z├╝rich/EPF Lausanne/Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland—mark a crucial step towards future quantum technologies, which promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing applications.



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Colliding stars explain enigmatic 17th century explosion

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New observations made with APEX and other telescopes reveal that the star that European astronomers saw appear in the sky in 1670 was not a nova, but a much rarer, violent breed of stellar collision.

via Science Daily

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New democracies need about 8 years for popular support to develop

Science Focus

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As a democracy, the United States has required the support of the general population for success since its birth. Since 2010, some new attempts at democratic government have sprung into existence through what's referred to as the “Arab Spring.” Yet because of their turbulent starts and limited public support, many have wondered about the fate and success of those nations. Is it possible that popular support for these new governments will grow over time?

In order to answer that question, two researchers from Frankfurt's Goethe University have recently investigated what drives support for democracy. They explored 380,000 individual-level observations from 104 countries over the years of 1994 to 2013. In their study, the researchers were able to control for improvements or deterioration in the general state of the country through a number of measures; this let them separate support for democracy from support for the general progress of a nation.

To specifically target emerging democracies, they based their analysis on two different data sets. The first data set covered both developed and less-developed countries across the world. The second set focused on African countries, because many of these nations are transitioning to democratic systems. In their analysis, the scientists identified periods of democratic rule for each nation. They next quantified the total time spent as a democracy. Finally, they calculated the amount of time each individual spent under democratic rule.

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New filter could advance terahertz data transmission

Science Focus

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University of Utah engineers have discovered a new approach for designing filters capable of separating different frequencies in

The post New filter could advance terahertz data transmission has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Tarantula Nebula Star Forming Gas Cloud Sculpture Rectangle Sticker

Here's a great sheet of stickers featuring a beautiful image from deep space


tagged with: envelope sealers, tnlmcsfr, billowing interstellar gas clouds, awesome hubble images, tarantula nebula, large magellanic cloud, star forming activity, young hot stars, star nurseries, outer space photographs, triggering star formation

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series An awesome mobile phone shell featuring the Tarantula Nebula of the Large Magellanic Cloud, which is the nearest galaxy to the Milky Way, our galactic home. This Hubble image shows old stars from the distant past and rich, interstellar gas clouds feeding the formation of new ones. The most massive and hottest stars are intense, high-energy radiation sources and this pushes away what remains of the gas and dust, compressing and sculpting it. As the whorls and eddies clump and stretch it, gravity takes over and the birth of the next generation of new stars is triggered.

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Image credit: NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) and ESA

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A graphene solution for microwave interference

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Microwave communication is ubiquitous in the modern world, with electromagnetic waves in the tens of gigahertz range providing efficient transmission with wide bandwidth for data links between Earth-orbiting satellites and ground stations. Such ultra-high frequency wireless communication is now so common, with a resultant crowding of the spectral bands allocated to different communications channels, that interference and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) are serious concerns.

via Science Daily

Atlas V Launches MMS

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Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

The Active Cigar Galaxy - Messier 82 Cover For The iPad Mini

Here's a great iPad case from Zazzle featuring a Hubble-related design. Maybe you'd like to see your name on it? Click to personalize and see what it's like!


tagged with: agmet, hubble, cigar galaxy, active galaxies, hubble space photography, outer space, stars, cosmological, messier 82, astronomy pictures, chandra

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series Composite of images of the active galaxy Messier 82 from the three Great Observatories: Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and Spitzer Space Telescope. X-ray data recorded by Chandra appears here in blue, infrared light recorded by Spitzer appears in red. Hubble's observation of hydrogen emission appears in orange. Hubble's bluest observation appears in yellow-green.
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image code: agmet

Image credit: Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-Ray Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope

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Measuring galaxy evolution with globular clusters

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Globular clusters are gravitationally bound ensembles of stars, as many as a million stars in some cases, grouped in roughly spherical clusters with diameters as small as only tens of light-years. Globular clusters are typically located in the outer regions (the halos) of galaxies; the Milky Way galaxy has about two hundred globular clusters orbiting it. Astronomers are interested in globular clusters in part because they are home to many of the oldest known stars, but also because of their locations in the halos. C



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Porpoise or penguin?

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Space Science Image of the Week: Some galaxies take on more familiar forms than others, as shown in this aquatic-themed Hubble image of merging galaxy pair Arp 142

via ESA Space Science

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/03/Porpoise_or_penguin

Molecule-making machine simplifies complex chemistry

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A new molecule-making machine could do for chemistry what 3-D printing did for engineering: Make it fast, flexible

The post Molecule-making machine simplifies complex chemistry has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Star Birth in Constellation Cygnus, The Swan Stickers

Here's a great sheet of stickers featuring a beautiful image from deep space


tagged with: envelope sealers, star clusters, nebulae, gstlnrsr, rcw120, breathtaking astronomy images, star nurseries, inspirational stars, ionised gas clouds, star forming regions, galaxies, starfields, eso, european southern observatory, vista

Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series A gorgeous star forming region in Constellation Cygnus (The Swan). This Hubble image shows a dust-rich, interstellar gas cloud with a new-born star in the centre of the hour-glass shape. The glowing blue of the hydrogen in this nebula is due to the jets being emitted from the forming star as dust falls into into it and this causes the heating and turbulence of the hydrogen. The star, known as S106 IR, is reaching the end of its birth and will soon enter the much quieter period of adulthood known as the main stage.

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Image code: cygsb

Image credit: NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) and ESA

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Eye in Orion Black Handle Acoustic Guitar Wall Sticker

Here's a great wall decal featuring a beautiful image from deep space


tagged with: cosmic, astronomy, acoustic, guitar, funky, eye, orion nebula, bright, abstract digital art, aqua, colorful, shape, space, image, iris, nasa hubble, space art, streaks, pink, blue

Abstract digital artwork inspired by one of NASA/Hubble's images of the Orion Nebula on the shape of an acoustic guitar.

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