Saturday, 22 July 2017

Starry Wingtip of Small Magellanic Cloud Business Card

Starry Wingtip of Small Magellanic Cloud Business Card
Astronomy series: The tip of the "wing" of the Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy is dazzling in this view from NASA's Great Observatories. The Small Magellanic Cloud, or…


Apollo 11: Catching Some Sun

more »
Bright sunlight glints and long dark shadows mark this image of the lunar surface. It was taken July 20, 1969 by Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first to walk on the Moon. Pictured is the mission's lunar module, the Eagle, and spacesuited lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin unfurling a long sheet of foil also known as the Solar Wind Composition Experiment. Exposed facing the Sun, the foil trapped particles streaming outward in the solar wind, catching a sample of material from the Sun itself. Along with moon rocks and lunar soil samples, the solar wind collector was returned for analysis in earthbound laboratories.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Bag With Moon Dust in It Fetches $1.8 Million From a Mystery Buyer

more »
A lunar landing, a museum loan, a theft, a critical error, a legal battle — and now, a sale at auction. What’s next for this bag of moon dust?
via New York Times

Friday, 21 July 2017

Superluminous supernova marks the death of a star at cosmic high noon

more »
The death of a massive star in a distant galaxy 10 billion years ago created a rare superluminous supernova, one of the most distant ever discovered. The brilliant explosion, more than three times as bright as the 100 billion stars of our Milky Way galaxy combined, occurred about 3.5 billion years after the big bang at a period known as 'cosmic high noon,' when the rate of star formation in the universe reached its peak.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

The moon is front and center during a total solar eclipse

more »
In the lead-up to a total solar eclipse, most of the attention is on the sun, but Earth's moon also has a starring role.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Flashes of light on dark matter

more »
A web that passes through infinite intergalactic spaces, a dense cosmic forest illuminated by very distant lights and a huge enigma to solve. These are the picturesque ingredients of a scientific research that adds an important element for understanding one of the fundamental components of our Universe: dark matter.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Scientists get best measure of star-forming material in galaxy clusters in early universe

more »
The international Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) collaboration has combined observations from several of the world's most powerful telescopes to carry out one of the largest studies yet of molecular gas -- the raw material which fuels star formation throughout the universe -- in three of the most distant clusters of galaxies ever found, detected as they appeared when the universe was only four billion years old.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Groundbreaking for an international neutrino experiment

Holographic imaging could be used to detect signs of life in space

more »
Engineers say a method called digital holographic microscopy could be used to detect living microbes in space.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Phobos: Moon over Mars

more »
A tiny moon with a scary name, Phobos emerges from behind the Red Planet in this timelapse sequence from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Over 22 minutes the 13 separate exposures were captured near the 2016 closest approach of Mars to planet Earth. Martians have to look to the west to watch Phobos rise, though. The small moon is closer to its parent planet than any other moon in the Solar System, about 3,700 miles (6,000 kilometers) above the Martian surface. It completes one orbit in just 7 hours and 39 minutes. That's faster than a Mars rotation, which corresponds to about 24 hours and 40 minutes. So on Mars, Phobos can be seen to rise above the western horizon 3 times a day. Still, Phobos is doomed.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

more »
It was midafternoon, but it was dark in an area in Boulder, Colorado on Aug. 3, 1998. A thick cloud appeared overhead and dimmed the land below for more than 30 minutes. Well-calibrated radiometers showed that there were very low levels of light reaching the ground, sufficiently low that researchers decided to simulate this interesting event with computer models. Now in 2017, inspired by the event in Boulder, NASA scientists will explore the moon's eclipse of the sun to learn more about Earth's energy system.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Thursday, 20 July 2017

NASA’s Hubble Sees Martian Moon Orbiting the Red Planet


The Tiny Moon Phobos Is Photographed During Its Quick Trip Around Mars

While photographing Mars, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured a cameo appearance of the tiny moon Phobos on its trek around the Red Planet. Discovered in 1877, the diminutive, potato-shaped moon is so small that it appears star-like in the Hubble pictures. Phobos orbits Mars in just 7 hours and 39 minutes, which is faster than Mars rotates. The moon’s orbit is very slowly shrinking, meaning it will eventually shatter under Mars’ gravitational pull, or crash into the planet. Hubble took 13 separate exposures over 22 minutes to create a time-lapse video showing the moon’s orbital path.


via Hubble - News feed
http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2017-29

Viewing Martian moon orbiting the red planet

more »
While photographing Mars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a cameo appearance of the tiny moon Phobos on its trek around the Red Planet. Hubble took 13 separate exposures over 22 minutes to create a time-lapse video showing the moon's orbital path.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Spiral arms allow school children to weigh black holes

more »
Astronomers have provided a way for armchair astronomers, and even primary school children, to merely look at a spiral galaxy and estimate the mass of its hidden, central black hole.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Cucumbers in space provide insights on root growth

more »
Scientists have untangled the competing influences of water and gravity on plant roots -- by growing cucumbers during spaceflight.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

IC 1396: Emission Nebula in Cepheus

more »
Stunning emission nebula IC 1396 mixes glowing cosmic gas and dark dust clouds in the high and far off constellation of Cepheus. Energized by the bright central star seen here, this star forming region sprawls across hundreds of light-years, spanning over three degrees on the sky while nearly 3,000 light-years from planet Earth. Among the intriguing dark shapes within IC 1396, the winding Elephant's Trunk nebula lies just below center. Stars could still be forming inside the dark shapes by gravitational collapse. But as the denser clouds are eroded away by powerful stellar winds and radiation, any forming stars will ultimately be cutoff from the reservoir of star stuff. The gorgeous color view is a composition of image data from narrowband filters, mapping emission from the nebula's atomic oxygen, hydrogen, and sulfur into blue, green, and red hues.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Trilobites: What a Total Solar Eclipse Looks Like From Space

more »
A time lapse made from a Japanese weather satellite’s images shows the shadow the moon casts on the Earth when it blocks out the sun.
via New York Times

High-energy trap in our galaxy's center, revealed by gamma-ray telescopes

more »
The center of our Milky Way contains a 'trap' that concentrates some of the highest-energy cosmic rays, among the fastest particles in the galaxy, a combined analysis of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the High Energy Stereoscopic System, a ground-based observatory in Namibia, suggests.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Ireson Hill on Mars

more »

What created this unusual hill on Mars? Its history has become a topic of research, but its shape and two-tone structure makes it one of the more unusual hills that the robotic Curiosity rover on Mars has rolled near. Dubbed Ireson Hill, the mound rises about 5 meters high and spans about 15 meters across. Ireson Hill is located on the Bagnold Dune field on the slope of Mount Sharp in Gale Crater on Mars. The featured 41-image panorama has been horizontally compressed to include the entire hill. The image was taken on February 2 and released last week. Because Mars is moving behind the Sun as seen from the Earth, NASA will soon stop sending commands to its Martian orbiters and rovers until about August 1.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

NASA Neutron star mission begins science operations

more »
The Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer, or NICER, payload completed commissioning and calibration and all systems are working as expected.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

New hot Jupiter marks the first collaborative exoplanet discovery

more »
Researchers have discovered a new 'Hot Jupiter' exoplanet.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Last command

more »

LISA Pathfinder principal investigator Stefano Vitale sends the final command to the spacecraft, shutting it down after successfully demonstrating the technology to build ESA's future gravitational wave observatory
via ESA Space Science
http://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2017/07/Last_command

Space station project seeks to crystalize the means to counteract nerve poisons

more »
The microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS) may hold the key to improving our understanding of how to combat toxic nerve agents such as sarin and VX.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Starry Wingtip of Small Magellanic Cloud Barely There iPhone 6 Case

Starry Wingtip of Small Magellanic Cloud Barely There iPhone 6 Case
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series: The tip of the "wing" of the Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy is dazzling in this new view from NASA's Great Observatories. The Small…


Ancient, massive asteroid impact could explain Martian geological mysteries

more »
A colossal impact with a large asteroid early in Mars' history may have ripped off a chunk of the northern hemisphere and left behind a legacy of metallic elements in the planet's interior. The crash also created a ring of rocky debris around Mars that may have later clumped together to form its moons, Phobos and Deimos.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Thunder Moon over Pisa

more »

What's wrong with this picture? If you figure it out, you may then realize where the image was taken. The oddity lies actually in one of the buildings -- it leans. The Leaning Tower of Pisa has been an iconic legend since shortly after its construction began in the year 1173. Now part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site, folklore holds that Galileo used the leaning tower to dramatically demonstrate the gravitational principle that objects of different mass fall the same. Between the Leaning Tower of Pisa on the right and Pisa Cathedral and the Pisa Baptistery on the left, a full "Thunder" moon was visible last week when the image was taken. Using modern analyses, the tower has been successfully stabilized and, barring the unexpected, should hold its present tilt for the next 200 years.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Graphenea opens new graphene oxide pilot plant

more »

Graphenea announces the opening of its new graphene oxide (GO) pilot plant with 1 tonne per annum production capacity. Although Graphenea is already producing GO dispersion, powder, and films, the new plant significantly increases production capacity, simultaneously allowing for higher quality and batch-to-batch reproducibility. The plant houses in-line quality control of each individual batch.

Although the production volume is large, the new plant can accommodate custom requirements regarding flake size, oxygen levels, and other specifications. Orders for multi-kilogram quantities will be processed with short delivery times. The production capacity is multiplied by 20 times compared to capabilities before the pilot plant, allowing for development and industrial scale supplies.

Importantly, Graphenea offers GO customization for integrating into different polymer matrices. This is an important new capability that brings the company a step closer to satisfying the growing graphene/polymer composite market. Polymer composites possess numerous mechanical and thermal benefits, holding potential for industries such as construction, aerospace, packaging, etc. The polymer additive industry is currently worth about €50 billion.

This is a new step in Graphenea's GO roadmap. The next step is to build a 500 tonne/year industrial plant. The pilot plant construction was funded by the EU Horizon 2020 program “SME Instrument” project GO4APP.

New plant benefits

  • Large-scale production of GO allows entry to the advanced polymers industry;
  • Production capacity increase 20-fold;
  • Dramatic reduction in GO cost, increasing the production scale and supporting applications development;
  • Producing tailor made GO materials to improve compatibility with different matrices, leading to a broad range of applications;
  • Improving the mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of advanced polymers;
  • Creating a cost-competitive final advanced polymer composites new market category using GO additives.

About Graphenea

Graphenea, a leading graphene producer venture backed by Repsol, was established in 2010, and has since grown to be one of the world's largest providers of graphene. The company is headquartered at the nanotechnology cluster CIC nanoGune in San Sebastian, Spain and the MIT campus in Cambridge, Boston, MA. Graphenea employs 25 people and exports graphene materials to more than 600 customers in 55 countries. The company has focused on constant improvement of graphene quality, becoming a supplier customers can rely on. Graphenea employs a team of skilled laboratory staff who have brought graphene production techniques to a new level. The company produces CVD graphene wafers and graphene oxide. Graphenea partners with large multinationals to develop custom graphene materials for their applications. Its research agility and ability to keep pace with the progress of graphene science and technology has allowed Graphenea to become a core partner in the Graphene Flagship, a ten year project of the European Commission worth a billion euros. The company keeps a close relation with the world's leading scientists, regularly publishing scientific articles of the highest level and holds a strong patent portfolio.


via Graphenea

Spiral galaxy NGC 1232 and Little Theta Tote Bag

Spiral galaxy NGC 1232 and Little Theta Tote Bag
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series: A fantastic bag featuring a stunning, mind-blowing image of the large spiral galaxy NGC 1232. It is based on three exposures in ultra-violet,…


New brown dwarf discovered by citizen science project

more »
One night three months ago, Rosa Castro finished her dinner, opened her laptop, and uncovered a novel object that was neither planet nor star. Therapist by day and amateur astronomer by night, Castro joined the NASA-funded Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 citizen science project when it began in February -- not knowing she would become one of four volunteers to help identify the project's first brown dwarf, formally known as WISEA J110125.95+540052.8.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Monday, 17 July 2017

Fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes

more »
Researchers have developed a fast, inexpensive method to make electrodes for supercapacitors, with applications in electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers.
via Science Daily

Space sound waves around Earth: Electrons whistle while they work?

more »
NASA's Van Allen Probes have observed a new population of space sound waves, called plasmaspheric hiss, which are important in removing high-energy particles from around Earth that can damage satellites.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

HIE-ISOLDE: Nuclear physics gets further energy boost

Moon Shadow versus Sun Reflection

more »

What are those lights and shadows crossing the Earth? As the featured five-second time-lapse video progresses, a full day on planet Earth is depicted as seen from Japan's Himawari-8 satellite in geostationary orbit high above the Pacific Ocean. The Sun rises to the right and sets to the left, illuminating the half of Earth that is most directly below. A reflected image of the Sun -- a Sun glint -- is visible as a bright spot that moves from right to left. More unusual, though, is the dark spot that moves from the lower left to upper right That is the shadow of the Moon, and it can only appear when the Moon goes directly between the Earth and the Sun. Last year, on the day these images were taken, the most deeply shadowed region experienced a total eclipse of the Sun. Next month a similarly dark shadow will sweep right across the USA.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Introducing Juice

more »

Space Science Image of the Week: Presenting the latest design of our Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer, Juice
via ESA Space Science
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/07/Exploring_Jupiter

Sunday, 16 July 2017

Lightning Eclipse from the Planet of the Goats

more »

Thunderstorms almost spoiled this view of the spectacular 2011 June 15 total lunar eclipse. Instead, storm clouds parted for 10 minutes during the total eclipse phase and lightning bolts contributed to the dramatic sky. Captured with a 30-second exposure the scene also inspired one of the more memorable titles (thanks to the astrophotographer) in APOD's now 22-year history. Of course, the lightning reference clearly makes sense, and the shadow play of the dark lunar eclipse was widely viewed across planet Earth in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. The picture itself, however, was shot from the Greek island of Ikaria at Pezi. That area is known as "the planet of the goats" because of the rough terrain and strange looking rocks.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Saturday, 15 July 2017

Crab Nebula in Taurus - outer space picture Wrist Watch

Crab Nebula in Taurus - outer space picture Wrist Watch
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series: A great outer space picture featuring a three colour composite of the well-known Crab Nebula (also known as Messier 1), as observed with the…


Close-up of The Great Red Spot

more »
On July 11, the Juno spacecraft once again swung near to Jupiter's turbulent cloud tops in its looping 53 day orbit around the Solar System's ruling gas giant. About 11 minutes after perijove 7, its closest approach on this orbit, it passed directly above Jupiter's Great Red Spot. During the much anticipated fly over, it captured this close-up image data from a distance of less than 10,000 kilometers. The raw JunoCam data was subsequently processed by citizen scientists. Very long-lived but found to be shrinking, the Solar System's largest storm system was measure to be 16,350 kilometers wide on April 15. That's about 1.3 times the diameter of planet Earth.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Hubble spots a barred Lynx spiral

more »
Discovered by British astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago, NGC 2500 lies about 30 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Lynx. NGC 2500 is a particular kind of spiral galaxy known as a barred spiral, its wispy arms swirling out from a bright, elongated core. 
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Friday, 14 July 2017

Fluorine grants white graphene new powers

more »
Fluorination of hexagonal boron nitride, a common insulator, turns it into a magnetic semiconductor. That may make the heat-resistant material suitable for electronics and sensors in extreme environments.
via Science Daily

Trilobites: Unlocking Mysteries in the Sun’s 11-Year Cycle

more »
Two studies focused on the sun’s maximum and minimum periods of activity, yielding new findings about its internal processes and external corona.
via New York Times

One of the brightest galaxies ever discovered

more »
Thanks to an amplified image produced by a gravitational lens, and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, a team of scientists has discovered one of the brightest galaxies known from the epoch when the universe had 20 percent of its present age.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

NGC 4449: Close-up of a Small Galaxy

more »
(xxxedit and linkxxx) Grand spiral galaxies often seem to get all the glory. Their young, blue star clusters and pink star forming regions along sweeping spiral arms are guaranteed to attract attention. But small irregular galaxies form stars too, like NGC 4449, about 12 million light-years distant. Less than 20,000 light-years across, the small island universe is similar in size, and often compared to our Milky Way's satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This remarkable Hubble Space Telescope close-up of the well-studied galaxy was reprocessed to highlight the telltale reddish glow of hydrogen gas. The glow traces NGC 4449's widespread star forming regions, some even larger than those in the LMC, with enormous interstellar arcs and bubbles blown by short-lived, massive stars. NGC 4449 is a member of a group of galaxies found in the constellation Canes Venatici. It also holds the distinction of being the first dwarf galaxy with an identified tidal star stream.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

The Secret of the Sun’s Magnetic Cycles

more »
Step inside a simulation of the interior of the sun as its magnetic field reverses, a process that creates solar storms that can interrupt power grids and satellite communications on Earth.
via New York Times

Eagle eye view of CERN

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Full Moon and Boston Light

more »
This well-planned telephoto timelapse captures July's Full Moon rise across outer Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, planet Earth. In the foreground, the historic terrestrial beacon is known as Boston Light. July's Full Moon is known to some as a Thunder Moon, likely a reference to the sounds of the northern summer month's typically stormy weather. But the eastern sky was clear for this video sequence. Near the horizon, the long sight-line through atmospheric layers filters and refracts the moonlight, causing the rising Moon's reddened color, ragged edges and distorted shape.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Tributes to wetter times on Mars

more »

A dried-out river valley with numerous tributaries is seen in this recent view of the Red Planet captured by ESA’s Mars Express.


via ESA Space Science
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Tributes_to_wetter_times_on_Mars

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Spots Jupiter's Great Red Spot

more »
Images of Jupiter's Great Red Spot reveal a tangle of dark, veinous clouds weaving their way through a massive crimson oval. The JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno mission snapped pics of the most iconic feature of the solar system's largest planetary inhabitant during its July 10 flyby.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Trilobites: Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Gets Its Close-Up

more »
NASA’s Juno spacecraft passed a few thousand miles above the gargantuan storm, revealing intricate patterns of swirling clouds.
via New York Times

Moon Express Sets Its Sights on Deliveries to the Moon and Beyond

more »
The Florida start-up is not just aiming to win $20 million in the Google Lunar X Prize competition. It plans to be a payload delivery company.
via New York Times

Planet Nine hypothesis supported by new evidence

more »
Last year, the existence of an unknown planet in our Solar system was announced. However, this hypothesis was subsequently called into question as biases in the observational data were detected. Now astronomers have used a novel technique to analyze the orbits of the so-called extreme trans-Neptunian objects and, once again, they point out that there is something perturbing them: a planet located at a distance between 300 to 400 times the Earth-Sun separation.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Signature analysis of single molecules using their noise signals

more »
Unique noise signatures have been obtained from single molecules interacting with carbon nanotube-based electronic devices.
via Science Daily

Unusual galaxy in distant universe

more »
MACS2129-1 is dead in the sense that it no longer produces stars. But what makes this galaxy particularly significant is the fact that, unlike many dead galaxies, which tend to be elliptical or oval-shaped, this galaxy is disk or spiral-shaped, like the Milky Way, and its stars rotate in a flattened disk, much like the Milky Way's stars.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Messier 63: The Sunflower Galaxy

more »
A bright spiral galaxy of the northern sky, Messier 63 is about 25 million light-years distant in the loyal constellation Canes Venatici. Also cataloged as NGC 5055, the majestic island universe is nearly 100,000 light-years across. That's about the size of our own Milky Way Galaxy. Known by the popular moniker, The Sunflower Galaxy, M63 sports a bright yellowish core in this sharp composite image from space- and ground-based telescopes. Its sweeping blue spiral arms are streaked with cosmic dust lanes and dotted with pink star forming regions. A dominant member of a known galaxy group, M63 has faint, extended features that are likely star streams from tidally disrupted satellite galaxies. M63 shines across the electromagnetic spectrum and is thought to have undergone bursts of intense star formation.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Spin control in graphene at room temperature

more »

Researchers have created a room-temperature spin transistor from graphene and molybdenum disulfide. A spin transistor is an essential component of future spintronic devices that will manipulate electron spin instead of charge for information processing. Using the spin degree of freedom instead of shuttling around charged carriers will lead to orders of magnitude energy savings for all our electronic devices.

Graphene has long been recognized as an interesting spintronic material due to its long spin lifetime. A research team from Chalmers University in Sweden experimentally demonstrated two years ago that graphene preserves its spin longer than any other known material, up to nanoseconds. The long lifetime  is a result of weak spin-orbit interaction. Contrary to graphene, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), another 2D material of growing importance in recent years, has a very strong spin-orbit interaction which results in extremely short spin lifetimes. Now the same team of researchers stacked these two materials and created spin valves that control transport between the graphene and the MoS2. When the valve is “open”, carriers tunnel to MoS2 and lose their spin properties. When the valve is “closed”, carriers stay in graphene and preserve their spins. The valve is opened and closed by simple electrostatic gating. Electrostatic gate control of spin currents in 2D material devices is a milestone achievement towards practical realizations of spintronics. The research was published in the journal Nature Communications.

Coloured Scanning Electron Microscope Image of a Fabricated MoS2/Graphene 2D Materials Heterostructure Spintronic Device. Credit: Spin FET@Chalmers

The scientists are part of the Graphene Flagship, a 10-year, billion-euro project of the European Commission for bringing graphene from fundamental research to market products. It is through Flagship meetings that the researchers started collaborating with Graphenea, who provided the high-quality graphene films for this device. The MoS2 was mechanically exfoliated from large single crystal pieces and transferred on top of the graphene.

Other than use in spin transistors, the device could have imaginative new applications in electronic technology, because it contains magnetic memory elements, semiconductors and graphene, as well as having the capability of performing spintronic switching.


via Graphenea

Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Squeezing innovation out of the NASA Twins study: Pipetting and cell isolation in space

more »
NASA is evaluating more efficient research techniques to prepare for the journey to Mars. Innovative thinking could improve the way biological samples are processed and transported from space back to research labs on Earth for future studies.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Making telescopes that curve and twist

more »
A new tool for computational design allows users to turn any 3-D shape into a collapsible telescoping structure. New mathematical methods capture the complex and diverse properties of such structures, which are valuable for a variety of applications in 3-D fabrication and robotics -- particularly where mechanisms must be compact in size and easily deployable.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Clean water that's 'just right' with new sensor solution

more »
Scientists combined basic research on an interesting form of carbon with a unique microsensor to make an easy-to-use, table-top tool that quickly and cheaply detects disinfection byproducts in our drinking water before it reaches consumers.
via Science Daily