Tuesday, 22 August 2017

Hubble's twisted galaxy

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Gravity governs the movements of the cosmos. It draws flocks of galaxies together to form small groups and more massive galaxy clusters, and brings duos so close that they begin to tug at one another. This latter scenario can have extreme consequences, with members of interacting pairs of galaxies often being dramatically distorted, torn apart, or driven to smash into one another, abandoning their former identities and merging to form a single accumulation of gas, dust and stars.
via Science Daily
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Saturn-lit Tethys

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Cassini gazes across the icy rings of Saturn toward the icy moon Tethys, whose night side is illuminated by Saturnshine, or sunlight reflected by the planet.
via Science Daily
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Large asteroid to safely pass Earth on Sept. 1

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via Science Daily
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Brown dwarf weather forecasts improved

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Dim objects called brown dwarfs, less massive than the Sun but more massive than Jupiter, have powerful winds and clouds -- specifically, hot patchy clouds made of iron droplets and silicate dust. Scientists recently realized these giant clouds can move and thicken or thin surprisingly rapidly, in less than an Earth day, but did not understand why.
via Science Daily
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Gravity, 'mechanical loading' are key to cartilage development

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Mechanical loading is required for creating cartilage that is then turned to bone; however, little is known about cartilage development in the absence of gravity. Now, bioengineers have determined that microgravity may inhibit cartilage formation. Findings reveal that fracture healing for astronauts in space, as well as patients on bed rest here on Earth, could be compromised in the absence of mechanical loading.
via Science Daily
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Trace of galaxies at the heart of a gigantic galaxy cluster

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The discovery of numerous ultra-diffuse galaxies is both remarkable and puzzling, explain scientists in a new report.
via Science Daily
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The moving Martian bow shock

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Physicists throw new light on the interaction between the planet Mars and supersonic particles in the solar wind.
via Science Daily
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Stellar Group, Tarantula Nebula outer space image Jelly Belly Tin

Stellar Group, Tarantula Nebula outer space image Jelly Belly Tin
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series: Hundreds of brilliant blue stars wreathed by warm, glowing clouds in appear in this the most detailed view of the largest stellar nursery in our…


Turning human waste into plastic, nutrients could aid long-distance space travel

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Imagine you're on your way to Mars, and you lose a crucial tool during a spacewalk. Not to worry, you'll simply re-enter your spacecraft and use some microorganisms to convert your urine and exhaled carbon dioxide into chemicals to make a new tool. That's one goal of scientists developing ways to make long space trips feasible.
via Science Daily
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A Total Solar Eclipse over Wyoming

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Will the sky be clear enough to see the eclipse? This question was on the minds of many people attempting to view yesterday's solar eclipse. The path of total darkness crossed the mainland of the USA from coast to coast, from Oregon to South Carolina -- but a partial eclipse occurred above all of North America. Unfortunately, many locations saw predominantly clouds. One location that did not was a bank of Green River Lake, Wyoming. There, clouds blocked the Sun intermittantly up to one minute before totality. Parting clouds then moved far enough away to allow the center image of the featured composite sequence to be taken. This image shows the corona of the Sun extending out past the central dark Moon that blocks our familiar Sun. The surrounding images show the partial phases of the solar eclipse both before and after totality.

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