Monday, 26 June 2017

2-D material's traits could send electronics R&D spinning in new directions

more »
Researchers created an atomically thin material and used X-rays to measure its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as 'spintronics.'
via Science Daily

Topsy-turvy motion creates light switch effect at Uranus

more »
Uranus' magnetosphere, the region defined by the planet's magnetic field and the material trapped inside it, gets flipped on and off like a light switch every day as it rotates along with the planet, scientists have discovered. It's 'open' in one orientation, allowing solar wind to flow into the magnetosphere; it later closes, forming a shield against the solar wind and deflecting it away from the planet.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Cool power: Breakthroughs in solar panel cooling technology

more »
Breakthroughs in solar panel cooling tech will help keep NASA’s Parker Solar Probe operating at peak performance — even while flying through the sun’s corona
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place

Q&A: A Matter of Considerable Gravity

more »
All the planets in the solar system interact gravitationally with the sun, but Jupiter’s great mass makes this interaction visible.
via New York Times

Artistic Impression: The Surface of TRAPPIST-1f

more »

If you could stand on the surface of the newly discovered Earth-sized exoplanet TRAPPIST-1f, what would you see? Presently, no Earthling knows for sure, but the featured illustration depicts a reasoned guess based on observational data taken by NASA's Sun-orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope. In 2017, four more Earth-sized planets were found by Spitzer, including TRAPPIST-1f, in addition to three discovered in 2015 from the ground. From the planet's surface, near the mild terminator between night and day, you might see water, ice, and rock on the ground, while water-based clouds might hover above. Past the clouds, the small central star TRAPPIST-1 would appear more red than our Sun, but angularly larger due to the close orbit. With seven known Earth-sized planets -- many of which pass near each other -- the TRAPPIST-1 system is not only a candidate to have life, but intercommunicating life -- although a preliminary search has found no obvious transmissions.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Artificial brain helps Gaia catch speeding stars

more »

With the help of software that mimics a human brain, ESA’s Gaia satellite spotted six stars zipping at high speed from the centre of our Galaxy to its outskirts. This could provide key information about some of the most obscure regions of the Milky Way. 


via ESA Space Science
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Gaia/Artificial_brain_helps_Gaia_catch_speeding_stars

Summer solstice Sun

more »

Space Science Image of the Week: A multi-hued view of the Sun seen from space on 21 June
via ESA Space Science
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/06/SOHO_s_summer_solstice_Sun

Sunday, 25 June 2017

The N44 Superbubble

more »

What created this gigantic hole? The vast emission nebula N44 in our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud has a large, 250 light-year hole and astronomers are trying to figure out why. One possibility is particle winds expelled by massive stars in the bubble's interior that are pushing out the glowing gas. This answer was found to be inconsistent with measured wind velocities, however. Another possibility is that the expanding shells of old supernovas have sculpted the unusual space cavern. An unexpected clue of hot X-ray emitting gas was recently been detected escaping the N44 superbubble. The featured image was taken in three very specific colors by the huge 8-meter Gemini South Telescope on Cerro Pachon in Chile.

Zazzle Space Gifts for young and old

Saturday, 24 June 2017

Spiral Galaxy - NGC 253 Business Card

Spiral Galaxy - NGC 253 Business Card
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series: …


Magnetic memories of a metal world

more »
Research deciphering the hidden magnetic messages encoded in a rare group of meteorites has helped secure nearly half a billion dollars of NASA funding for a journey to their parent asteroid -- the only known place in the solar system where scientists can examine directly what is probably a metallic core.
via Science Daily
Zazzle Space Exploration market place