Wednesday, 24 May 2017

NGC 4565: Galaxy on Edge

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Is our Galaxy this thin? We believe so. Magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 4565 is viewed edge-on from planet Earth. Also known as the Needle Galaxy for its narrow profile, bright NGC 4565 is a stop on many telescopic tours of the northern sky, in the faint but well-groomed constellation Coma Berenices. This sharp, colorful image reveals the galaxy's bulging central core cut by obscuring dust lanes that lace NGC 4565's thin galactic plane. An assortment of other background galaxies is included in the pretty field of view, with neighboring galaxy NGC 4562 at the upper left. NGC 4565 itself lies about 40 million light-years distant and spans some 100,000 light-years. Easily spotted with small telescopes, sky enthusiasts consider NGC 4565 to be a prominent celestial masterpiece Messier missed.

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Schiaparelli landing investigation completed

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The inquiry into the crash-landing of the ExoMars Schiaparelli module has concluded that conflicting information in the onboard computer caused the descent sequence to end prematurely.


via ESA Space Science
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/ExoMars/Schiaparelli_landing_investigation_completed

Graphenea meets other technology stakeholders at NanoTech 2017

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Graphenea showed presence at this year’s NanoTech conference and trade show in Washington, DC. The world’s largest nanotech event was co-located with the National Innovation Summit, the National SBIR/STTR Conference, and TechConnect 2017, which made for the largest global meeting on physical and life sciences. Graphenea had a booth at the exhibit and CEO Jesus de la Fuente gave a talk on the role of graphene in next-generation lithium-sulfur batteries. Graphene plays a significant role in improving the cathodes of these batteries of the future.

Photo: The Spain pavillion at NanoTech 2017.

Delivering application-focused research from top international academic, government and private industry labs, NanoTech is an annual event uniquely designed to identify new technology trends, development tools, product opportunities, R&D collaborations, and commercialization partners.  The co-located TechConnect strives to accelerate the commercialization of innovations out of the lab and into industry. The Technical Program spotlights applications focused innovations, materials and devices emerging from industrial, government and academic labs worldwide. The Innovation Partnering Program gathers market-ready, commercially-viable innovations into the largest global technology accelerator program.

Graphenea is always glad to participate in events that bring together innovators, funding agencies, national and federal labs, international research organizations, universities, tech transfer offices and investment and corporate partners. Such cross-sectoral meetings are necessary in today’s connected world and offer a good opportunity to find common interests between technology stakeholders.

Photo: Nanotech 2017 - a busy meeting place.


via Graphenea

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

Kick-off for the 2017 LHC physics season

Stellar Nursery R136 in the Tarantula Nebula Courier Bag

Stellar Nursery R136 in the Tarantula Nebula Courier Bag
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series: Hundreds of brilliant blue stars wreathed by warm, glowing clouds in appear in this the most detailed view of the largest stellar nursery in our…


Approaching Jupiter

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What would it look like to approach Jupiter? To help answer this, a team of 91 amateur astrophotographers took over 1,000 pictures of Jupiter from the Earth with the resulting images aligned and digitally merged into the featured time-lapse video. Image taking began in 2014 December and lasted just over three months. The resulting fictitious approach sequence has similarities to what was seen by NASA's robotic Juno spacecraft as it first approached the Jovian world last July. The video begins with Jupiter appearing as a small orb near the image center. As Jupiter nears from below, the planet looms ever larger while the rotation of its cloud bands becomes apparent. Jupiter's shrinking Great Red Spot rotates into view twice, at times showing unusual activity. Many white ovals are visible moving around the giant planet. The video ends as the imaginary spacecraft passes over Jupiter's North Pole.

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Eye of God Helix Nebula, Galaxies and Stars iPhone 7 Case

Eye of God Helix Nebula, Galaxies and Stars iPhone 7 Case
Galaxies, Stars and Nebulae series A fantastic colour-composite image of the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293), also known as The Eye of God. The blue-green glow in the centre of the Helix…


Monday, 22 May 2017

Trilobites: Freeze-Dried Mouse Sperm Survives Trip in Space

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Although tests did find slightly increased DNA damage, compared with freeze-dried earth sperm, the space version did the job when it came to fertilizing eggs.
via New York Times

Star storm

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Space Science Image of the Week: Aoife van Linden Tol, recipient of the first ESA–Ars Electronica residency, created this sketch while researching for her art–science project at ESA
via ESA Space Science
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/05/Lost_in_the_photosphere_by_Aoife_van_Linden_Tol

A Zodiacal Sky over Horseshoe Bend

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What's causing the unusual ray of white light extending upward from the central horizon? Dust orbiting the Sun. At certain times of the year, a band of sun-reflecting dust from the inner Solar System rises prominently before sunrise and is called zodiacal light. The dust originates mostly from faint Jupiter-family comets and slowly spirals into the Sun. Pictured, in front of the zodiacal light, is a spectacular view of Horseshoe Bend of the Colorado River. Emitted from well behind the zodiacal light is a spectacular sky that includes many bright stars including Sirius, several blue star clusters including the Pleiades, and an assortment of red nebula including Barnard's Loop in Orion. The 30-image composite was taken earlier this month in nearly complete darkness only six inches from the edge of a dangerous cliff.

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